“He is notably an outstanding conductor, so to watch him live in action was pure bliss.”

Operawire: Manhattan School of Music 2017-18 Review – The Snow Maiden: Juliana Levinson & Castmates Deliver Rousing Showcase of Rimsky-Korsakov Gem

As the lights dimmed in the Alan M. And Joan Taub Ades Theater, Maestro Jorge Parodi exuded a clear connection and passion towards the opening music that carried all throughout the opera. One could feel the excitement and tenderness of each note that the MSM musicians played, in coordination with Parodi’s delicate pulse and intuitive awareness. He is notably an outstanding conductor, so to watch him live in action was pure bliss. The flute, clarinet, violin, cello and oboe soloists also played in sync with Parodi and really raised the bar of the overall production. The music was profoundly moving.”

“conductor Jorge Parodi, who led the orchestra with the right mix of restraint and exuberance”

Tampa Bay Times: Ensembles highlight Opera Tampa’s well-rounded ‘Figaro’

TAMPA — After The Barber of Seville, the predecessor in Pierre Beaumarchais’ Figaro trilogy, The Marriage of Figaro promised an entertaining continuity. Singers in two major roles would return, Gabriel Preisser as Figaro and Cecilia Violetta López as the former Rosina (now Countess Almaviva), this time in an opera scored by Mozart that some consider the greatest ever written. Smaller roles also acquitted themselves well, including Robyn Rocklein as Marcellina and Eileen Vanessa Rodriguez as the saucy Barbarina. So, too, did conductor Jorge Parodi, who led the orchestra with the right mix of restraint and exuberance, starting with that explosive overture.”

“Jorge Parodi, (…) handled the unconventional environment with aplomb”

The Wall Street Journal: Bellini and Brontosaurs

The Metropolitan Opera kicks off its season with ‘Norma’; the American Museum of Natural History offers family-friendly performances of ‘Rhoda and the Fossil Hunt’

“As Rhoda, the bright, irrepressible soprano Jennifer Zetlan led the audience in a hunt around the exhibits to find the fossil needed to complete Toppy’s painting, her doubts and eventual triumph deftly captured in Mr. Musto’s score, which included a catchy waltz (“Scientific inference”) and an exuberantly Gershwin-like trio finale (“Deinocheirus with your great big claws”). She was impressively unfazed by the distractions of the occasionally unruly spectators and passers-by. Robert Orth (Toppy), Patrick Cook (Osborn), and the ensemble, led by Jorge Parodi, also handled the unconventional environment with aplomb, and the setting—right between the museum’s gigantic T. Rex and Apatosaurus mounted dinosaurs—couldn’t have been more spectacular.”

“Conductor Jorge Parodi drew vivid colors from the orchestra with clarity and elegance while allowing the voices to bloom”

Opera News: Manhattan School of Music’s Senior Opera Theater delivered a joyful, life-affirming production of Janáček’s Adventures of Vixen Sharp-Ears

The opera proved an excellent choice for the young performers, with vocal demands within their capabilities and opportunities to feature the predominantly female corps. As director Dona D. Vaughn made clear in her opening remarks, the cast inhabited their animal personae with relish, but even the human characters found character-specific physicality that aided the storytelling. Conductor Jorge Parodi drew vivid colors from the orchestra with clarity and elegance while allowing the voices to bloom in the intimate dimensions of the Ades Performance Space.

“a fully convincing presentation of Purcell’s masterpiece, its quality a tribute to the high level of talent assembled and the executive capabilities of conductor Jorge Parodi”

Opera News: New York Lyric Opera presentation of Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas

New York Lyric Opera’s March 21 concert performance of Dido and Aeneas provided musical pleasure well beyond expectations. The organization offers emerging artists opportunities to tackle big assignments in somewhat makeshift circumstances: you couldn’t help but anticipate that this Dido — given at the Bruno Walter Auditorium as part of a full day of one-off opera performances, and sandwiched between a potted Ring and a Mozart concert — would seem like just one more item off the assembly line. Instead, it was a fully convincing presentation of Purcell’s masterpiece, its quality a tribute to the high level of talent assembled and the executive capabilities of conductor Jorge Parodi.

“the opera played beautifully, with graceful music throughout, sonorous choruses and a radiant finale.”

New York Times: A Woman Goes Crazy: An Early Version

Giovanni Paisiello’s 1789 opera “Nina, o sia La Pazza per Amore” at the Manhattan School of Music.

Conducted by Jorge Parodi, the school’s appealing (…) production emphasizes the work’s charm more than its intensity, but certainly proves that “Nina” deserves attention and professional American revivals.

“Ably presiding over the pit was Argentinian conductor Jorge Parodi”

The opera — arguably Britten’s best known theatrical work of music after Peter Grimes — has enjoyed world-wide popularity ever since its premiere in 1954.  It’s easy to see why, judging from the Banff Centre presentation of the first of two performances of  the Centre’s  Opera as Theatre production of the masterwork on Thursday at the Eric Harvie Theatre.  Directed by Kelly Robinson, the Banff show sounds as good as it looks — and it looks very good indeed.